just pretend sigh RSS

the night holds out a dark lantern and springs its shutter open, so that in the pitch of mah blindness, mah scotoma is blasted into a battle sphere of wild meteors, blood-blown moons, suns and molten planets, butchered asteroids, berserk comets, luminary clusters, gaudy wreaths of stellar motion, green nebulae, gaseous nebulae, white and spiral nebulae, hairy-stars and fire balls, shimmering sunspots and solar flares, blinding faculae, flocculi, and day-stars, new moons, red planets, and stars of blue and tinsel, trinket-yellow and white stars, harlequin showers, spectral moons and mock moons, sol, helios, phoebus, mars, saturn, dipper, saucepan, big bear and little bear, in collision, in colour, here, in the guttles of the sump, alone and at war with the macrocosm, unner-borne, eyes squeezed shut and rolling-squeezing, squeezing out the last drips of the spectrum behind mah lids, till ah open mah eyes again and feel them adjust back to grey, for everything is forever grey and the pressure unner mah ribs is hurting me, breathing is getting harder, lungs will cleave apart, only just on one half swallered and the pressure...the pressure...the planets of pain...nick cave

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Nov
12th
Mon
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Denise Grünstein, Headhunter, 2009 © Denise Grünstein
Exhibition Distances differentes, November 7, 2012 - January 21, 2013

Denise Grünstein, Headhunter, 2009 © Denise Grünstein

Exhibition Distances differentes, November 7, 2012 - January 21, 2013

(Source: iheartmyart)

Nov
8th
Thu
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Klaus Weber
Venue: Herald St, London
Exhibition Title: ALL BODIES FALL EQUALLY FAST

Klaus Weber

Venue: Herald St, London

Exhibition Title: ALL BODIES FALL EQUALLY FAST

(via wowgreat)

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Friedrich Kunath
So Hard to Take it Easy, 2012
Oil, acrylic and colored pencil on canvas
104 x 99 inches
Friedrich Kunath
So Hard to Take it Easy, 2012
Oil, acrylic and colored pencil on canvas
104 x 99 inches
Nov
7th
Wed
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Jonathan Weiskopf

Untitled, 2012
digital c-print, 41 x 55 inches

Jonathan Weiskopf

Untitled, 2012

digital c-print, 41 x 55 inches

(via sympathyfortheartgallery)

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(Source: tightartists, via raverphoenix)

Nov
6th
Tue
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Auguste Rodin, The Eternal Idol (The Lovers), 1889

My very dearest, down on both knees before your beautiful body which I embrace.” Rodin to Camille Claudel (1844).

(via jennyannmorgan)

Nov
5th
Mon
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Michael Thompson, Girl with a Hole in Her Stocking. c. 2008

Michael Thompson, Girl with a Hole in Her Stocking. c. 2008

(Source: paperimages, via sideview)

Oct
9th
Tue
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phillipsdepury:

ALEX PRAGER | Crystal from Polyester, 2007 | Color coupler print
Sold for $6,250 at the Photographs sale, 2 October 2012, New York.

phillipsdepury:

ALEX PRAGER | Crystal from Polyester, 2007 | Color coupler print

Sold for $6,250 at the Photographs sale, 2 October 2012, New York.

(Source: phillipsauction)

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phillipsdepury:

MAURIZIO CATTELAN | Daddy Daddy, 2008 | polyurethane resin, steel, and industrial epoxy car paint with UV protection
Sold for $2,546,500 at the Contemporary Art Evening Sale, 10 May 2012, New York. [Video]
When I think of a sculpture, I always imagine it like that, far away, in some way already dead. It has always surprised me when people laugh at some of my art works: maybe in front of death laughter is a spontaneous reaction. (Maurizio Cattelan in “Killing Me Softly: A Conversation with Maurizio Cattelan,” interview with Giancarlo Politi et al, Flash Art (International edition) 37, no. 237, July-September 2004, p. 92).
Originally conceived for the acclaimed exhibition theanyspacewhatever, curated by Nancy Spector at The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in 2008, Daddy Daddy, 2008, is a sculptural rendering of the beloved protagonist in Walt Disney’s Pinocchio. Cattelan’s rendering bears all of the characteristic marks of the classic Pinocchio from his eponymous Disney film. In its lustrous surface, vibrant hues, and rounded form, comprised of polyurethanic resin, steel, and industrial epoxy car paint, Daddy Daddy, 2008, is an exact replica of the Disney character. His face is plump and sweet, with sparkling blue eyes and a button nose, destined to grow should he tell a lie. As the viewer will remember, Pinocchio plays the hero by rescuing both his father and Jiminy from the ravenous whale, Monstro, but not without tragically drowning, eliciting the image from which Cattelan bases his original installation.
In 2011, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum rotunda was once again invaded and reinvented by Cattelan; in the exhibition Maurizio Cattelan: All, Daddy Daddy, 2008, was rigged from the ceiling of the museum in a retrospective of the artist’s oeuvre. All the works, secured and suspended with thick white ropes and metal armature, hovered midair in a massive chandelier of suspended animation. With a levitational twist, the en masse installation offered a profound meditation on mortality, the core of Cattelan’s practice. His renowned use of taxidermy, as seen in Love Saves Life, 1995, Novecento, 1997, and Tourists, 1997, presents a state of illusory life. Even more poignant than the stuffed animals are his examples of anthropomorphic installation; in Bidibidobidiboo, 1996, a squirrel has committed suicide with a miniature revolver in his sordid kitchen. Like Daddy Daddy, 2008, a loveable creature meets an untimely, yet darkly comic end. It is as if Death stalks these characters.
In the original installation of Daddy Daddy in 2008, Cattelan’s beloved hero lying at the base of the rotunda was perhaps ultimately foiled by the fear of his unauthentic existence. However, exhibited in All (re-enacted in the same space as theanyspacewhatever, 2008-2009), Cattelan proffers a new end to Pinocchio’s story. Instead of meeting a watery grave, Daddy Daddy, 2008, floats amidst the totality of the artist’s epic body of work, hovering between the throws of death and the promise of deliverance.

phillipsdepury:

MAURIZIO CATTELAN | Daddy Daddy, 2008 | polyurethane resin, steel, and industrial epoxy car paint with UV protection

Sold for $2,546,500 at the Contemporary Art Evening Sale, 10 May 2012, New York. [Video]

When I think of a sculpture, I always imagine it like that, far away, in some way already dead. It has always surprised me when people laugh at some of my art works: maybe in front of death laughter is a spontaneous reaction. (Maurizio Cattelan in “Killing Me Softly: A Conversation with Maurizio Cattelan,” interview with Giancarlo Politi et al, Flash Art (International edition) 37, no. 237, July-September 2004, p. 92).

Originally conceived for the acclaimed exhibition theanyspacewhatever, curated by Nancy Spector at The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in 2008, Daddy Daddy, 2008, is a sculptural rendering of the beloved protagonist in Walt Disney’s Pinocchio. Cattelan’s rendering bears all of the characteristic marks of the classic Pinocchio from his eponymous Disney film. In its lustrous surface, vibrant hues, and rounded form, comprised of polyurethanic resin, steel, and industrial epoxy car paint, Daddy Daddy, 2008, is an exact replica of the Disney character. His face is plump and sweet, with sparkling blue eyes and a button nose, destined to grow should he tell a lie. As the viewer will remember, Pinocchio plays the hero by rescuing both his father and Jiminy from the ravenous whale, Monstro, but not without tragically drowning, eliciting the image from which Cattelan bases his original installation.

In 2011, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum rotunda was once again invaded and reinvented by Cattelan; in the exhibition Maurizio Cattelan: All, Daddy Daddy, 2008, was rigged from the ceiling of the museum in a retrospective of the artist’s oeuvre. All the works, secured and suspended with thick white ropes and metal armature, hovered midair in a massive chandelier of suspended animation. With a levitational twist, the en masse installation offered a profound meditation on mortality, the core of Cattelan’s practice. His renowned use of taxidermy, as seen in Love Saves Life, 1995, Novecento, 1997, and Tourists, 1997, presents a state of illusory life. Even more poignant than the stuffed animals are his examples of anthropomorphic installation; in Bidibidobidiboo, 1996, a squirrel has committed suicide with a miniature revolver in his sordid kitchen. Like Daddy Daddy, 2008, a loveable creature meets an untimely, yet darkly comic end. It is as if Death stalks these characters.

In the original installation of Daddy Daddy in 2008, Cattelan’s beloved hero lying at the base of the rotunda was perhaps ultimately foiled by the fear of his unauthentic existence. However, exhibited in All (re-enacted in the same space as theanyspacewhatever, 2008-2009), Cattelan proffers a new end to Pinocchio’s story. Instead of meeting a watery grave, Daddy Daddy, 2008, floats amidst the totality of the artist’s epic body of work, hovering between the throws of death and the promise of deliverance.

(Source: phillipsauction)

Oct
8th
Mon
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(Source: raverphoenix)

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(Source: raverphoenix)